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1 edition of Crosshole seismic tomography and the areal basis inversion technique found in the catalog.

Crosshole seismic tomography and the areal basis inversion technique

Crosshole seismic tomography and the areal basis inversion technique

a model study

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Published by AECL, Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Man .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby M.H. Serzu ... [et al.].
SeriesTechnical record (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd) -- 625
ContributionsSerzu, M.H., Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.
The Physical Object
Pagination63 p. :
Number of Pages63
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20603684M

Seismic inversion aims to reconstruct a quantitative model of the Earth subsurface, by solving an inverse problem based on seismic measurements. There are at least three fundamental issues to be solved simultaneously: non-linearity, non-uniqueness, and instability. This book covers the basic theory and techniques used in seismic inversion, corresponding to these three issues, emphasising the. Seismic Downhole & Crosshole Surveys Seismic Downhole & Crosshole Surveys In order to develop detailed layer velocity information so that engineering parameters such as shear modulus and Poisson's ratio may be calculated, down hole or cross hole surveys may be performed.

This book provides a systematic review of tomographic applications in seismology and the future directions. rift rock seismic refraction seismic tomography shown shows similar slab solution space station studies subduction surface wave technique teleseismic term three-dimensional tomography upper mantle Page - Active high-resolution. Seismic tomography is a technique for imaging the subsurface of the Earth with seismic waves produced by earthquakes or explosions.P-, S-, and surface waves can be used for tomographic models of different resolutions based on seismic wavelength, wave source distance, and the seismograph array data received at seismometers are used to solve an inverse problem, wherein the .

Crosshole Seismic. Crosshole Seismic Surveys are used to obtain in situ properties of soil and rock strata. Often used as part of a comprehensive geotechnical investigation, the crosshole seismic survey yields valuable information as to the strength and cohesiveness of the underlying sediment and bedrock, information that is critical to any engineering endeavor.   Seismic Tomography: Theory and practice 1st ed Edition by H.M. Iyer (Editor), Kazuro Hirahara (Editor) ISBN ISBN demonstrates that seismologists, with their internal exploration techniques, are in the process of becoming the 'doctors of the Earth' - Geotechnique; The book, with its well illustrated.


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Crosshole seismic tomography and the areal basis inversion technique Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract. In travel time inversion of crosshole seismic tomography, when dealing with real data, the following three issues need to be addressed: how to suppress the effect of data errors, how to balance the data contribution and reference model, and how to properly set the geological constraints (well logs) in an by:   Processing was carried out on a conventional PC by using a noncommercial collection of programs for the treatment of crosshole seismic data.

Tomography traveltime inversion was carried out by Migratom (Tweeton, ), a PC-based program developed by the U.S.

Bureau of Mines and stored as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report on a website Cited by: Crosshole tomography field data was collected on bridge foundation sites in Pennsylvania, in close proximity to geotechnical boring locations.

Profiles determined from these field measurements were plotted against drilling data, and these comparisons revealed ability of crosshole wave velocities to differentiate overburden soil from by: 1.

The acoustic inverse problem of crosshole seismology is nonlinear in the medium velocities and ill‐posed because of the lack of complete data coverage surrounding the area of interest. In light of these facts, this paper develops a new nonlinear waveform tomography technique for imaging acoustic velocities from crosshole seismic data.

However, it is difficult to characterize these deeply buried karst caves accurately and completely. In this study, we used crosshole seismic CT techniques to image the P-wave velocities of the limestone stratum.

Field experiments were designed to acquire seismic data from 44 boreholes and survey lines at depths of > 75 by: 7. Many tomographic interpretations of crosshole seismic traveltimes have approximated the raypaths with straight lines connecting the source and receiver. This approximation is valid where the velocity does not vary greatly, but in many regions of interest velocity variations of percent or more are observed, causing significant ray curvature.

Crosshole test applications. Its applications in geophysical services are multiple, from the location of "anomalous zones" (faults, galleries, cavities, etc.) between boreholes, determine the distribution of the field of seismic velocities between boreholes, etc.

As well as for the study of heterogeneities of the terrain between boreholes In the same way that the downhole is applicable in the. Second in waveform tomography, we include the 2D anisotropic parameter model in the waveform simulation, so that the seismic waveform is better matched through the inversion.

As two vertical boreholes are so close in crosshole acquisition geometry, the fine-layering effect is. Seismic methods can provide detailed information about rock properties and geological structure between boreholes. Fewer boreholes are needed to achieve a continuous picture of the subsurface thereby reducing overall costs and the risk of missing target features.

Borehole seismic methods largely fall into two categories, namely, Crosshole Seismics and Seismic Tomography. Seismic inversion aims to reconstruct a quantitative model of the Earth subsurface, by solving an inverse problem based on seismic measurements. There are at least three fundamental issues to be solved simultaneously: non-linearity, non-uniqueness, and instability.

The inversion of seismic travel-time data for radially varying media was initially investigated by Herglotz, Wiechert, and Bateman (the HWB method) in the early part of the 20th century [1].

Systematic errors in seismic travel‐time data from mis‐located shot and receiver positions and/or systematic timing delays can distort considerably the results of tomographic inversions.

Standard crosshole tomographic inversion algorithms do not account for systematic errors. We present a case study of crosshole seismic tomography. An interesting feature of this crosshole seismic acquisition is its cross-firing fashionbetween twovertical lly,there are two sets of crosshole seismic data in a conventional sense.

The first data set places sources in one borehole and the receiver arrays in another. Methods to eonstruet images of an objeet from "projeetions" of x-rays, ultrasound or eleetromagnetie waves have found wide applieations in eleetron mieroseopy, diagnostie medicine and radio astronomy.

Projeetions are measurable quantities that are a funetiona- usually involving a line integral - of physieal properties of an objeet.4/5(1). Abstract (summary): A crosshole seismic experiment deploys sources and receivers at many depth positions in parallel boreholes.

The resulting ray paths form a crisscrossing pattern through the intervening rock. Many tomographic interpretations of the traveltimes have approximated the ray paths with straight lines, ignoring ray path curvature.

Crosshole (or “crosswell”) seismic measures the velocity of seismic waves between boreholes. There are two types of crosshole approaches. The conventional approach involves lowering a 3-component borehole geophone down one hole while lowering a source down an adjacent hole(s), firing the source at some prescribed depth interval.

Both techniques are applicable to a variety of seismic problems including earth-quake travel-time tomography, reflection, refraction/wide-angle reflection, borehole, and surface-wave phase.

In fact, inversion artifacts close to boreholes are an issue commonly encountered in crosshole GPR (and seismic) tomography [e.g., Maurer and Green, ; Becht et al., ; Irving et al., ]. A well‐known source of such artifacts are imprecisely known transmitter and receiver positions within the boreholes [ Linde et al., ].

This is the first book of its kind on seismic amplitude inversion in the context of reflection tomography. The aim of the monograph is to advocate the use of ray-amplitude data, separately or jointly with traveltime data, in reflection seismic emphasis of seismic exploration is on imaging techniques, so that seismic section can be interpreted directly as a geological section.

This technique measures vertical changes in seismic velocity by placing a source at the top of a borehole and measuring travel-times at multiple intervals in the borehole, usually with a 3-component geophone. Cross hole Seismic Testing & Cross hole seismic tomography.

Cross hole seismic testing measures the velocity of seismic waves between. Crosshole Survey – The difference between this survey and the Downhole one is that in the Crosshole approach there are two boreholes. A downhole seismometer is in one of the holes and the shear wave source in the other.

This approach is a little more definitive for acquiring information on discrete layers. Seismic tomography is a group of seismic inversion methods based on data prediction via solution of a wave equation. This chapter discusses seismic tomography based on ray theory, which essentially is a high frequency approximation to the wave equation.Seismic tomography I Formulation Seismic tomography combines data prediction with inversion in order to constrain 2-D and 3-D models of the Earth represented by a significant number of parameters.

If we represent some elastic property of the subsurface (e.g. velocity) by .